COLD SINK

 

  


COLD SINK

36" x 24" (91 x 61 cm)

Acrylic on MDF panel

£4500


Many people rate power stations high on their list of architectural eyesores. Personally, I love them, especially the cooling towers. This is partly, I suspect, for the childish reason that they puff out steam like steam trains. I especially like the hyperboloid shape - if that's the right word. The curves are feminine, elegant and graceful. They don't make my eyes even a little bit sore. The great towers give me the same feeling as seeing close up, huge ships, big cranes, massive bridges or gigantic skyscrapers. The enormity, the sheer scale is almost scary. To anyone interested in industrial architecture, a tour of a working power station is a treat. It's a treat only exceeded by visiting a decommissioned and derelict site, provided of course, you can get inside 'before the ghosts flee'. On walks in the countryside I'm often impressed by friends who know the name of every plant, every tree, every bird and flower. But if I ask about, say, a power pole, there's silence. The song of the 'lesser spotted infrastructure' goes unheard. One final word: the title 'Cold Sink' may lack poetry but, thermodynamically, I believe it is correct. A cooling tower is the cold sink to the heat engine that is a power station.